Plum dumplings?

We had dinner at our in-laws’ tonight, because MIL was planning a plum dumpling dinner and talked about it like it was the Best Thing Ever.  I’m not sure if it’s a Czech thing specifically, or maybe a more general eastern European thing.

Has anyone ever had this?

Let me describe:

It seems you take full plums (pits included, though I suppose they aren’t requisite if you were so inclined to remove them), wrap them in some sort of pastry dough, then I’m guessing they were steamed.  You put these on your plate, top them with some sort of shredded semi-soft cheese (I didn’t ask what it was for fear it was made from something ungodly), melted butter, and either granulated or powdered sugar (your choice).

And this is dinner.

They made a modified version for my husband which had jam inside instead of whole plums, because Frank is generally loathe to eat cooked fruit.  He makes an exuberant exception for my apple pie, wise man he is.

Anyway, these people were gaga over it.  Me and the kids, not so much.  I thought it tasted decent enough, but I was sick of eating it before I’d eaten more than a snack’s worth.  We came back to our house and topped it off with dino-chicken nuggets and french fries.

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2 responses to “Plum dumplings?

  1. I always called them Szvecen Knaedle….It’s a HUNGARIAN/CZECH thing and you just might not get it. It all about the memories of childhood, the end of summer, etc. Just trust me: they are, in fact, The Best Thing Ever.

  2. I just came across your post. I cannot express how glad I am that you described your encounter. LMAO! My mother did the same thing for neighbors she meet when my family settled into our new home. I wasn’t born yet but I grew up with the story. My mom served these Fruit Dumplings, Ovocne Knedliky, as a dinner entree. The husband, a large man, finish up his dumplings quickly and then asked what was the entree! And yes we served it with, sugar, butter, and cottage cheese. Czech’s in Czech Republic can get tvaroh – a type of crumbly cheese that is hard to duplicate in the states.

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